A Parasol Too Large To Carry

The one constant that we have seen everywhere we have traveled is that every city has something unique to bring to the travel experience.  We never really know what we will find when we travel to some of the great cities in the world.  One of the stops on the map of the city of Seville, Spain is the Metropol Parasol.  Since it was not visible from the bus route we decided to walk the few blocks from the bus stop and see what all the fuss was about.

The Metropol Parasol is a wooden structure located in La Encarnación square, in the old quarter of Seville, Spain.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

Construction began in 2005.  It stands 85 feet high and is 490 by 230 feet long.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

Construction finished in 2011.  It is believed to be the largest all wooden structure in the world.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

The building is affectionately known as Las Setas de la Encarnación (Incarnación’s mushrooms).  The design is said to be six parasols which form a giant mushroom.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

Construction on the site actually began in early 1990 but during the excavation they found a ruin dating to the Roman and Andalusian eras and construction was immediately stopped.

The Metropol is organized into four levels.  The sublevel is the Antiquarium where the Roman and Moorish remains are on display in a museum.  The Central Market is located on level 1.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

They sell lots of fresh fish and meats…

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

Olives and cheeses…

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

And loads of fresh fruits and vegetables.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

The roof of Level 1 is the surface of the open-air public plaza, shaded by the wooden parasols above and designed for public events. Levels 2 and 3 house a restaurant, and two stages for entertainment.  They also offer one of the best views of the city centre.  Our new friends Ruth and Mick had a better idea and we decided to have a drink under the parasol instead.

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

In fact we decided that sitting under the parasol was a perfect way for me to celebrate my 54th birthday.  And no, I didn’t eat the whole thing by myself.  🙂

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

© Photo by Florence Ricchiazzi Lince

Florence Lince

http://about.me/florencelince

 

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4 comments

  1. Happy Birthday Florence! And what a special place to celebrate. The Parasol is incredible – I didn’t know a thing about it. And to be made entirely of wood – astounding! Now I must go back to Seville. 🙂 ~Terri

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    1. Thank you for the birthday wishes. Can’t believe where the time has gone.

      I will say that I wish I had taken more photos of the Parasol in Seville while I was there. Sometimes I like not researching a location before we go and then wandering all the streets that are not highlighted with tourist data; we have stumbled onto some of the most amazing sights this way, so I didn’t do a lot of research on the Parasol until later.

      So much to see in this world and there just isn’t enough time. I’m going to try and see as much of it as possible however! 🙂

      Florence

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  2. I wish I could go back to Spain as a fully grown adult, since I was just a teenager, maybe didn’t notice nor appreciate like I would now! I missed the city of Seville, in my 2 week whirlwind tours with Spanish Club, 1974! This Parasol building is gorgeous and intriguing, Florence!

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    1. I hope you get to return to Spain one day. We saw and did enough in our six months so returning is not on our radar. The Parasol was most interesting for what it housed on the inside (the museum and the market).

      Like

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